School: Cromadh (B.)

Location:
Cromadh, Co. Luimnigh
Teacher:
Dáithí Ó Ceanntabhail
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The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0507, Page 016

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The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0507, Page 016

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  2. XML Page 016
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  1. (no title) (continued)

    The following childish, or perhaps better, children's rhyme preserves the names of the last dwellers in Croker's Road, Croom.

    (continued from previous page)
    a green slime".
    (John O'donnell, Skagh, Croom. 60bl.
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
  2. (no title)

    When I was a small boy I used hear it said, when it snowed, that "they were plucking geese in heaven".

    When I was a small boy, I used hear it said, when it snowed, that "they were plucking geese in Heaven". I have been reminded of the saying by seeing a similar comparison made in one of the school books.
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
  3. (no title)

    The rhyme on the preceding page - 15 - the habit of putting the names of persons into jingling rhymes prevailed in my home area too.

    (?) the rhyme on the preceding page,
    -15- the habit of putting the names of persons into jingling rhymes prevailed in my home are too. The name Cantwell was never as pronounced there, being always "Can-fill" with the emphasis on the "Can". My childish vanity was sorely wounded when it was linked to the phrase "Don't be romancing" and the jingle poured on my offended ears. "Don't be romancing, says Davy Canfill".
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
  4. (no title)

    Potatoes formed an important part of the food of both man and animal in my native district.

    Potatoes formed an important part of the food of both man and animal in my native district. I remember that on more than one occasion, I heard the remark. "The white horse is coming on them" used to signify that they had begun to boil. It was always said when the water began to make great white bubbles around the edge of the pot.
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
    Topics
    1. seánra
      1. seanchas aimsire (~6,442)
    2. táirgí
      1. táirgí bia (~3,601)
    Language
    English
  5. (no title)

    O Toomey the poet, they called him Seán O Toomey on gline (i.e. an grinn, notice that Paddy has l for r, and the blas of the Déise) had some sort of a little shop in Croom.

    In submitting the following item, which I received from Paddy McNamara, (Home assistance officer) of
    (continues on next page)
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.