School: Cromadh (B.)

Location:
Cromadh, Co. Luimnigh
Teacher:
Dáithí Ó Ceanntabhail
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The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0507, Page 119

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The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0507, Page 119

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  1. (no title) (continued)

    When boot-polish - "Martindale's Blacking" - was not available in our house, oaten straws were burned over an upturned pot-lid and the particles of carbon left were carefully collected on the lid.

    (continued from previous page)
    a greyish metallic sheen on the boot.
    (Tiobrad 'Arann)
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
  2. (no title)

    Sometimes one of these straws, being held in the hand by one of us children, was set alight at the end, and moved about, while the following rhyme or rann or whatever you choose to call it, was chanted in a monotone.

    Sometimes one of these straws, being held in the hand by one of us children, was set alight at the end and moved about, while the following rhyme or rann, or whatever you choose to call it, was chanted in monotone:
    Jack is alive and alive still!.
    If he dies in my hand, a forfeit I'll give.
    The same rhyme was used with a burning or glowing twig.
    (Tiob. 'Arann. I believe it was my mother who taught us the rhyme. D.O.C.)
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
  3. (no title)

    Long legs, crooked thighs, little head and no eyes" was a riddle much in vogue with us youngsters.

    Long legs, crooked thighs, little head and no eyes", was a riddle much in vogue with us youngsters" The answer is of course, the tongs.
    (D.O.C)
    The same riddle was in Glynn, Co. Limerick.
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
    Topics
    1. gníomhaíochtaí
      1. gníomhaíochtaí eacnamaíocha
        1. talmhaíocht (~2,659)
      2. gníomhaíochtaí sóisialta (~7)
        1. siamsaíocht agus caitheamh aimsire (~5,933)
    Language
    English
  4. (no title)

    When reaping with scythes was common, a mehal of men from the Foynes side went out reaping.

    When reaping with scythes was common, a mehal of men from the Foynes side went out reaping. There was one young fellow among them, whose father had died some time previously. When they lay into the mowing, it was not long until the young fellow began to weaken.
    There was an old man among the reapers, and he took pity on the young fellow, and he says to him, 'tis bad edge is killing you. I'll put up an edge for you". So he handled the scythe, and he edged it for the young fellow, and
    (continues on next page)
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.