School: Gort na Díogha (roll number 15587)

Location:
Gort na dTíobh Thiar, Co. na Gaillimhe
Teachers:
Séamus Ó Dochartaigh Bean Uí Dhochartaigh
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The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0016, Page 050

Archival Reference

The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0016, Page 050

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  1. XML School: Gort na Díogha
  2. XML Page 050
  3. XML “Rush Candles for Twelfth Night”
  4. XML “Cow Manure”
  5. XML “May Day”

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  1. (continued from previous page)
    first - the member of family after which it is called is the first supposed to die. In some places the candles are named after the 12 Apostles and in each the rosary is being said while the candles burn. See Page
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
  2. This is taken in from the stable and made into a cake or stand for the candles for 12th night. When the stand is finished with- up to the present day- many still keep the custom of making the manure into a ball and putting it behind a rafter in the kitchen or throwing it up in the loft (for good luck)
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.
    Topics
    1. gníomhaíochtaí
      1. gníomhaíochtaí eacnamaíocha
        1. talmhaíocht (~2,659)
    2. ócáidí
      1. ócáidí (de réir trátha bliana) (~11,476)
    Language
    English
    Informant
    Thomas Brennan
    Gender
    Male
    Age
    91
    Address
    Cnoc Mhic Scaithil, Co. na Gaillimhe
  3. Women are supposed to be capable of taking or rather bringing the butter, as it is called on May morning before sunrise. It is not right to give or take milk or butter on May Day. Taking the butter. The manure is taken out of the cows hoof and in this way the butter is brought. When people are churning if a person came in to light a pipe with a coal they would not let him out with his pipe in his mouth. Or if a person came into a house
    (continues on next page)
    Transcribed by a member of our volunteer transcription project.